Pranksters hack into Djokovic’s virtual audience to stream music and porn

Fans of Serbian tennis player Novak Djokovic gather before the Federal Court of Australia, while the star athlete is in full legal battle for his visa to enter the country and play in the Australian Open, in Melbourne, Australia, on January 10 2022. REUTERS / Sandra Sanders

By Byron Kaye

SYDNEY, Jan 10 (Reuters) – Australia’s efforts to allow the media and public to see tennis superstar Novak Djokovic’s court appeal against his visa cancellation turned into a circus Monday when pranksters they hacked internet links to stream loud music and pornographic content.

Due to the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus, the hearing was held virtually, through audiovisual links between the judge’s office and the government’s and Djokovic’s lawyers.

Minutes before the process began, the journalists clicked on a Microsoft Teams link that had just expired, provided by the court, without knowing that it had replaced the link. Instead of watching the process in real time, they came across pornographic images.

News Corp’s head of digital sports, Emily Benammar, remarked wryly that digital hackers had contributed at least one missing ingredient in what had become one of the biggest Australian courtroom dramas in recent years.

“Porn: the one thing missing from the entire Djokovic saga,” Benammar said in a tweet.

The link, which had been widely shared on social media in the previous days, had been replaced with a new one, which the court sent to the media. And when the hearing was scheduled to begin, at 10 in the morning, the new link led to a web page that had collapsed due to excessive visits.

The problems did not end there. Once the link was back online, the court process was accidentally interrupted by a member of the public, who joined the live stream but was not muted. “We’re in,” the person said, prompting a reprimand from Judge Anthony Kelly.

“I ask whoever is on screen to be quiet … the only people who should be in line with their microphones are the ones who are making presentations to the court,” Judge Kelly said.

Although some news outlets were able to watch the federal court hearing online, most had to resort to broadcasting a tennis podcast that featured commentary over the lawyers’ voices.

A court spokesperson was not immediately available for comment, but apologized for technical difficulties in an email to the media.

At four hours after the hearing, the court posted a third link – to its own YouTube channel – just in time for a late lunch break. After three hours of postponements, at 5:12 p.m., the link worked, just in time for the final sentence: Djokovic should be able to enter the country freely.

(Reporting by Byron Kaye; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore, translated by José Muñoz in the Gdańsk office)



Reference-www.infobae.com

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